Reviews

Words & Music

John Gabriel may be the best Actor-Singer around
- TV News

John's ability to tell the story of a song has now placed him among that select group of singers who can transport you by reaching into themselves
- Charles Grodin


John Gabriel – July 17 – Metropolitan Room

John Gabriel loves songs, adores songwriters and loves to sing and that love shined brightly at the Gardenia. He kept it simple: brief stories about the songs and the songwriters. There were some stories that you have heard before and some that you haven’t, but all contributed to a gracefully flowing evening. Cy Coleman’s “The Best Is Yet to Come” appropriately started things off and the held note on the final "mine" at the end of the tune showed the pipes were still in fine shape.

Moving from Coleman to the Gershwins (“They All Laughed”), Styne & Cahn (“Saturday Night”), Rodgers & Hart (“Little Girl Blue”) and Cole Porter (“At Long Last Love”), Gabriel presented the songs in a straightforward manner that emphasized the beauty of the material. His introduction to “I Remember You” as a reflection of Johnny Mercer’s love for Judy Garland gave the tender reading of the Mercer lyrics a particular poignancy.

Ben Lanzarone’s musical direction provided the perfect support for Gabriel. They both created an atmosphere that celebrated the Great American Songbook with style and class.

- Les Traub, Cabaret Scenes

As someone who watched soap operas in the seventies when my children were babies and I was tied to a daily routine of "burps and baths," John Gabriel, aka. Dr. Seneca Baeaulac, from the popular ABC soap “Ryan’s Hope,” was a most welcomed distraction. He was strikingly handsome and there was a quiet charm and elegance about him that endeared him to millions of other faithful fans and won him an Emmy nomination.

Throughout a long career that spans almost every facet of show business, he never lost his love for singing songs from the Great American Songbook. He recently presented an evening of favorite songs from favorite songwriters, entitled, “The Songs and Stories of Some Great American Songwriters” to a full house of ardent admirers and enthusiastic colleagues at The Metropolitan Room in New York.

Songs like the Gershwin’s “They All Laughed,” Johnny Mercer’s “I Remember You” and Rodgers and Hart’s “Wait Till You See Her” were accompanied by stories, delivered with a skilled actor’s sense of story-telling and a good comedian’s sense of timing. He credited his wife Sandy, an actress herself, for providing the show’s few but very effective one-liners.

Additionally, Gabriel showed his sense of style and good taste by dressing impeccably.

As the host of a new weekly radio show on the “Music of Your Life Network,“ Gabriel has clearly established himself as a “keeper of the flame” for the music he so clearly loves and enjoys performing. This show provides a mix of entertainment and education that would serve, on any stage in the country, as a lesson on the American songwriters of our time and the “art” of singing their classic standards.

– Lynn DiMenna, "AT THE RITZ!" - www.attheritz.org

"A winner. In short he's got what it takes."
– Daily Variety

"A highly personal show, Gabriel carries off the act, like his career- with a sense of humor, pride and persistence."
– New York Daily News

"Gabriel's strong baritone... shines. He has a rich, legit sound recalling the likes of John Raitt and Gordon MacRae."
– John Hoglund, Backstage

"John's ability to tell the story of the song has now placed him among that select group of singers who can transport you by reaching deep within themselves."
– Charles Grodin

"With Alfred Drake long since gone and Richard Kiley not too far removed from life, John Gabriel may be the best actor-singer around."
–TV News

"He sings honestly, sincerely and quite beautifully."
– New York Post

"With pianist Christopher Denny, John Gabriel presented From Broadway to Hollywood and Back at Danny’s Skylight Room. Illustrated with video clips, a portrait emerged of a personable, well-grounded man with a gentle sense of humor. And he can sing. Gabriel related his multi-media adventures with songs to illustrate life’s lessons, like, It’s Not Where You Start. Referring to his debut at The Little Club, he sang The Best Is Yet to Come. You can probably tell where Lullaby of Broadway and Love Walked In fit in. A handsome man with a mellow vocal tone, Gabriel used savvy and experience to interpret his songs with understanding. John Gabriel’s own easy-going charm... is a refreshing plus in the edgy world of show business, and this was the strength of his journey From Broadway to Hollywood and Back."
– Elizabeth Ahlfors, Cabaret Scenes

"At Danny's, he makes inventive use of anecdotes, film clips and songs in his multimedia show. The informal disposition, ready to laugh and resonant baritone appeal make him relaxing and refreshing to listen to."
– Entertainment Today

"There is a warm charm about the man. Gabriel's voice is smooth, with especially full bodied chest tones and he performs with beguiling integrity."
– Martin Schaeffer

"Marvelously inventive... Gabriel put so much charm into his performance... a performer of unusually high-voltage."
– Houston Post

With film clips to help, John has an unfolded cavalcade. It shows his humor, tenacity, ability to charm and entertain."
– Las Vegas Casino News